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Jen Latch, Author at Braille Skateboarding

In skateboarding, some tricks are reserved for advanced skaters. For example, you won’t be able to laser flip without first learning to ollie. Sometimes, however, there are tricks that you can learn at any level. Even if you haven’t worked out your ollies yet, you can still learn some great tricks. We’re here to let you know about one of our favorite tricks, the Strawberry Milkshake. And yes, YOU can learn it.

The Strawberry Milkshake is a fun trick to learn at all levels of skateboarding. Whether you’re a seasoned skater or just starting out, this is a great trick to know. It also happens to be a favorite here across the Braille Team.

This isn’t the same Strawberry Milkshake that cools you down with its frothy, delicious goodness on a hot summer day. Today we’ll be discussing the Strawberry Milkshake of skateboarding; a trick that any skateboarder can learn. A good place to start is by looking at the definition of a Strawberry Milkshake.

Strawberry Milkshake Definition

Strawberry Milkshakes are achieved by stepping off the skateboard with your front foot while simultaneously pushing the board down onto its side with your back foot, then using your back foot to scoop the board around like an Ollie Impossible. As the board finishes the rotation, the skater jumps back onto the board with their front foot, and rides away. 

It seems simple enough, right? Well, once you get the hang of them, they can feel very easy! Getting to that point, however, will take some practice and persistence. Below is a video tutorial that will cover the fine details of this trick.

Strawberry Milkshake Video Tutorial

We hope you enjoyed the tutorial and that you gained some insight on how to do a Strawberry Milkshake. Let’s take a look at this trick and really break it down. When learning the Strawberry Milkshake, it helps to go over these 4 crucial steps:

  1. Foot Position
  2. Practice Step #1
  3. Practice Step #2
  4. Putting it All Together

Let’s Get Into It!

Foot Position

For the Strawberry Milkshake, the foot position is extremely important. Setting up your feet properly is vital for landing this trick. The first thing we’ll go over is the foot position of your back foot.

strawberry milkshake

Place the ball of your foot right on the toe-side edge of the board, just over the back truck. Apply pressure to the ball of your back foot so that your heel is perched up, not making contact with the skateboard.

Your front foot also has to be very close to the edge of the skateboard. Your front foot will be hanging off the heel-side edge of the skateboard while the ball of your foot is weighted and your toes are facing toward the nose of the skateboard. It’s important to apply pressure to the ball of your front foot.

strawberry milkshake

As you apply pressure to the ball of your front foot, with your heel perched up, you’ll be set up to take your front foot off the board quickly and get it out of the way so that you can start the trick. 

Practice Step #1

This practice step is designed to help you build muscle memory for the Strawberry Milkshake. This step will break down the basic technique that you’ll be using to push the board over onto your back foot, which will set you up to finish the trick using your back foot.

For this practice step, set your feet up in the Strawberry Milkshake foot position as discussed above. Once your feet are in the appropriate position, simply step off the board with your front foot, and push down with your back foot to roll the board over onto that same foot.

For the purpose of this practice step, that’s all there is to it! Just practice stepping off with your front foot, pushing the board over onto your back foot and you will begin to develop the speed required to perform the Strawberry Milkshake while rolling. 

Back Foot Rotation

The second practice step that we’ll be going over will train your back foot to properly flip/ rotate/ wrap the skateboard for the Strawberry Milkshake. You can forget about your front foot during this practice step as your back foot will be in complete control of the skateboard.

For this practice step, set your board up on its side (primo). Put your front foot on the ground to the side of the board, and put your back foot up against the grip tape at the tail of the skateboard. Before you try this step, refer to the image below to ensure your feet and board are in the appropriate position.

Now that you’re properly set up, you can begin using your back foot in a swirling motion to half-flip and rotate the board 360-degrees, back to a neutral riding position. We aren’t trying to land the trick here, so once again, forget about your front foot.

Simply practice the motion with your back foot until you feel like you have complete and total control of the board. Dialing in this motion will take some practice. There are a lot of ways to lose control of your board during this trick, so practicing these steps will improve your consistency.

Remember, as your back foot performs the Strawberry Milkshake technique, try to keep that back foot as close to the board as possible as it spins. During a Strawberry Milkshake the back foot will also act as a stopper, or fail-safe, to minimize the chances of your board landing upside down or in primo position. When you’re comfortable with practice steps one and two, all that is left is to put it all together!

strawberry milkshake

Practice Step #2

Now it’s time to put the practice steps to work and land that Strawberry Milkshake while rolling. Ride at a comfortable speed, not too fast, but not too slow either. With your feet in the proper position, your front foot moves first. Quickly step off the board with your front foot. As you are stepping off, immediately put your back foot into action. Push down with that back foot to force the board over onto its side.

The ankle of your back foot should roll down with the board which will cause the board to rest on top of your back foot momentarily. With your front foot now firmly planted on the ground, your back foot will begin wrapping the board 360-degrees. As the rotation completes, jump forward slightly off your front foot. Now both feet will be in the air with the board.

Your back foot should be close to the board near the tail, acting as a point of control and following the board as it rotates, which prevents the board from landing primo or upside down. You’ll be able to spot your landing as both of your feet are now in the air, so once that board comes around the full 360-degrees, place your front foot back on the board. Bend your knees to absorb the impact and ride away clean!

strawberry milkshake

In Conclusion

Braille Skateboarding wants to see your best Strawberry Milkshake! Film a quick clip of you landing your best Strawberry Milkshake. Tag us on Instagram @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding.  Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing Strawberry Milkshakes! Now get out there and skate, Milkshakes are on us!

If you’re new to skateboarding and looking to improve your skills, definitely check out Skateboarding Made Simple. It’s the most detailed lesson plan for skateboarding that exists. With 7 different volumes, you’ll go from learning how to ride on a board, to skating skateparks and landing more advanced flatground tricks in no time!

Are you a newer skater? Do you have questions or need some guidance when it comes to skateboarding? Don’t worry, we’re here for you. Here’s what you should know!

1. Kickflips aren’t easy! Learn all of the basics before you move onto advanced skate tricks

The kickflip is arguably one of the most popular tricks in skateboarding. And when you see someone at a skate park, or in videos do it seamlessly, you can’t help but think, “I wanna learn that.” And you should! Many will get discouraged once they try and fail. The question to ask isn’t, “why can’t I do this?”, but “how’s my Ollie?”, “How comfortable am I on my board?”. These focus on progressing on all the earlier steps, so the Kickflip is easier to land.

The kickflip is not a beginner trick. You have to be in complete control of the board and feel comfortable on all stages of it. You have to be comfortable landing on it from a certain height, flicking it the right direction with the right amount of speed, etc…

Don’t get discouraged if you can’t do a kickflip right off the bat. Go back to the basics. Ride your board everywhere, get your Ollies and pop-shuvits down. Then, you’ll be in a better place to master the kickflip.

2. Don’t compare your progress to others

Skateboarding is an individual sport, meaning you can progress at any rate you feel comfortable with. You might see someone who’s really good and who’s been doing it a lot longer than you have and wonder, “wow, why am I not there?” You will get there.

Everyone starts out at the beginning. Every pro skater out there started out struggling with ollies. But they kept going. Put in the practice, aspire to be as good as others, look up to them, and know you can be as good as them if you persist and keep working at it.

3. Don’t be scared to go to the skatepark

We hear this a lot. Beginner skaters don’t want to go to the skatepark in fear of being called a poser or being looked down upon. Ignore that! Just remember that anyone who skates was once a beginner. They didn’t just wake up one day and were suddenly good.

If you’re not a beginner, but see a newer skater learning new tricks, encourage them! Chances are, they’re scared to be there and just want to learn how to drop in or learn how to skate a ledge. The skatepark is the safest place to do that, so help them through it.

Help us make the skatepark a safe environment for skater to learn and progress, regardless of their age or how new they are. Let’s make it a welcoming environment for everyone!

4. Equipment isn’t everything

There are two sides to this. The first side is you don’t need to spend a lot of money on a new complete and expect that you’re going to Ollie easier. That’s where practice comes in! Chances are, it’s not the deck, grip or shoes that’s holding you back. Put the time in and keep trying until you land that trick. Any regular skateboard will do.

The other side is don’t get a super cheap board. If you’re buying a board from Walmart or Target, it might actually make it harder than it needs to be to learn. So, find a happy medium when buying a board.

Whether you need a new complete, or just a new deck, just know you don’t need to spend a lot of money. Find the perfect sweet spot so you don’t make it harder on yourself when learning how to skate.

5. Skateboard to have fun! Don’t expect a sponsorship

It’s easy to look at these pro skater and aspire to be them. I mean, imagine making a living off of skateboard. That sounds rad! You get paid to skate and brands pay you to travel around the world and go to competitions. For some, that’s the dream. And if it’s yours, go for it! We’re here to back you up and help you progress.

But, if getting sponsored is your only reason for skating, it will actually make it harder. Sponsors look for those who are really good and having fun. And you should have fun, because even when you get sponsored, you’re still going to be skating and still going to be progressing.

It’s not all for the money. Go skate around your city, put out more skate parts and just have fun with it. The money will come, as long as you’re having fun!

6. Don’t risk injury to impress people

Being safe is a lot more important than looking cool in front of people at the skatepark. If you injure yourself, even if it’s a minor one, you won’t be able to skate for some time. So, if someone at the skatepark asks you to do some crazy drop in or something that you’re not sure you can do, stay safe and hold back. Sometimes, it’s not worse the risk.

7. Don’t end your skate day on a bad note. Don’t let a trick ruin your day.

We’ve all been there. You’ve had a great day at the skatepark, and you’re just gonna end your session with a trick you’ve done a few times before. But for some reason, you can’t land it. You’re throwing your board, yelling at the camera and when you fall, you just lay down for awhile. So, how do you let that not ruin your day?

Go back to something you know how to do really well. Like, you could do it in your sleep. This does a few things, but mostly builds your confidence back up. You know you can skate and you know you can land tricks. So end your session on landing it! Better to end happy than angry.

8. Surround yourself with other skaters. Watching them can help you progress

Skateboarding is an individual sport, but we can’t deny that it becomes more enjoyable when you’re with your friends. The best thing about skating with others is learning from them. You can watch them and see how they drop in or where they put their feet on the board, etc… And if you’re having trouble, they can help you. Plus, good skater are willing to help others learn, because they were in your position at one point.

9. Be willing to try new things on your skateboard

The amount of creativity on a skateboard is limitless. There are all the basic tricks, but there’s more that can be added to those that add up to more diverse, interesting tricks. Don’t stay in one place, but keep progressing and keep learning more tricks. Push yourself forward and learn those tricks, so you can get better!

10. Never. Give. Up.

This applies to everything outside of skateboarding, but every skater need to hear this. If you can’t ollie, keep trying and trying until you do it. Just keep pushing. I’ve heard from many skater that they tried 1,000 times before they landed their first ollie. You’re starting from the beginning, and it can be awkward for some people. Don’t get beaten down, don’t give up. Just keep trying and you will land those tricks. You’re more than capable!


Leave a comment below with what helped you the most as a skater and any tips we may have missed!

Are you interested in learning how to skateboard? Have you seen other skaters around town and want to learn those tricks? No matter if you’re scared, think you’re too old, or whatever the case is that might be holding you back, we have news for you. You can learn to skateboard!

Aaron Kyro Learn to skateboard
Aaron Kyro

History

My name is Aaron Kyro and I have been skateboarding for over 20 years. Over that time I have been sponsored by some of the world’s largest skateboarding brands including Volcom, Real, Thunder, Bones wheels, Swiss Bearings, and Circa shoes! I currently ride pro for Revive Skateboards.

Braille Skateboarding was created to help everyone learn how to skateboard. With our free tutorials and our full skateboarding lesson plan, Skateboarding Made Simple, you can be a great skateboarder!

Braille has a YouTube channel with over 4 million subscribers and counting. The core of our channel is skateboarding content and tutorials. We want to teach everyone to skateboard and show everyone the joy and excitement it can bring.

Here at Braille we want everyone to feel like they can progress on their board and learn to skate! That’s the basis that Braille is built off of. And we won’t stop until skateboarding is the most popular sport in the world.

Skateboarding Made Simple

I have been teaching people of all ages how to skateboard for the past several years and have found many things in common amongst new skaters.

I know what barriers skaters run into that cause them to not be able to land an ollie, kickflip, heelflip, or any other trick, get frustrated and give up. Just like any sport, persistence is key in skateboarding. So keep persisting and land those tricks!

Skateboarding does require practice and work and you don’t just wake up one morning and can land 360 flips every time. It is also true that there is an exact correct gradient to learning all of the tricks and exact ways to do each and every trick there is.

In Skateboarding Made Simple I unlock the secrets behind how the pros learn tricks and master them before going on to do them down stairs or on a rail.

Aaron Kyro

Skateboarding Made Simple is the most in-depth collection of skateboarding tricks out there. We know that skateboarding is an uncomfortable scene when you’re first starting out. But, Skateboarding Made Simple is your guide and helps ensure you’re really comfortable on your board!

There are 7 volumes of Skateboarding Made Simple volumes. As you progress through them, you learn the basics of flatground tricks, skatepark etiquette, grinds and slides, mini ramps, intermediate and advanced flatground tricks. Think of it as your long-term skateboarding roadmap.

I break down each trick into all of its parts so each step can be practiced separately  before going on to learning the whole trick. By using this method, you can learn to land any trick every time.

Practice Steps

If you practice the correct steps of the trick, you will build up to attempting it and landing it. The key here is to practice it for a good amount of time. For the Ollie, you should spend at least 15 minutes on each step, and then if you can’t land it, go back and spend another 5 minutes on each step. As you roll through the practice steps, you’ll eventually land it.

Let’s take kickflips for example. If you’re having trouble landing with both feet, but know you can catch it with one foot, you know something needs to change. Skateboarding Made Simple will help you identify that, by breaking the trick down into several practice steps. Once you do that, you will be able to land it.

It is very important to start off on the right foot with learning any new skill or sport. Whenever learning a new skill, it can often be awkward or uncomfortable, but it’s also exciting and fun. Having some guidance will keep it more exciting, so you don’t end up quitting after you just started.

Skateboarding Made Simple gives you the proper steps to starting out your skating THE RIGHT WAY!

What’s in Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1?

While there are 7 volumes in Skateboarding Made Simple Series, here’s what’s covered in Volume 1:

  • Riding basics which includes pushing, turning, and stopping
  • Ollies
  • Frontside 180s
  • Backside 180s
  • Pop shove its
  • Frontside pop shove its
  • Heelflips
  • Kickflips

This series teaches you an exact method of learning any skateboarding trick. Once you master this method you will be able to teach yourself anything in skateboarding.

Summary of the points covered in Skateboarding Made Simple:

  • HOW TO START OFF SKATING ON THE PROPER FOOT
  • THE BIGGEST REASON WHY PEOPLE GIVE UP SKATING
  • THE STEPS TO FAST PROGRESSION
  • WHICH TRICKS TO LEARN IN WHAT ORDER AND WHY
  • HOW TO GET YOUR OLLIE OFF THE GROUND
  • WHY YOUR TRICKS DON’T POP
  • HOW TO KEEP YOUR POP SHOVE ITS FROM LANDING PRIMOHOW TO
  • FULLY SPIN A HEELFLIP
  • HOW TO PROPERLY FLICK KICKFLIPS
  • HOW TO CATCH YOUR BOARD ON FLIP TRICKS

What other skaters have said about Skateboarding Made Simple

“Skateboarding Made Simple is by far the best guide to skateboarding basics ever! I learned kickflips and heelflips in about 2 hours, cleaned up my pop shuvits, and am close to back 180s thanks to you!”

“Wow! I really like how you composed this learning video because you actually learn. You have a smooth way of teaching that makes it easy to understand. I just wish this exsisted when i was first learning how to skate. Best how to video ill be sure to recommend it”

“I love this video because you actually TELL us how to do the tricks. I hate when it’s like, “pop it, flick it, and land it.” the little details are oh so important!”

“Whoa! this video is awesome and very helpfull !! Thanks so much!”

For a 1 hour skate lesson I charge $40.00. This video is comparable to hours of skate lessons with valuable information and drills packed into one 50 minute long video and it ONLY COSTS 7.99!

Get Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1

Get Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1-7

So don’t waste hundreds of dollars on lessons when you can get one video and learn all of the basic skateboard tricks without leaving your driveway. Only $6.99 to learn how to properly ride your board and master the most important 7 tricks on a skateboard is an amazing deal.

If you are not satisfied with the purchase for any reason, be sure to send an email to shop@brailleskateboarding.com. I will refund you the full video price! I am so sure that you will love the video that I will give you your money back if you don’t! So, what do you have to lose?

Watch the video below for how it’s helped other skaters and what they’ve done to improve their tricks and progress in skateboarding.

Results with Skateboarding Made Simple


Length: 50 Min 00 Sec
File Size: 422.7 MB
File Type: .mp4

Have you had success with Skateboarding Made Simple? We want to see your progression video! Film a quick clip of the tricks you’ve learned, and tag @brailleskate, #brailleskate and #brailleskateboarding on Instagram. Let us know what you liked the most about Skateboarding Made Simple, so we can share it and capitalize on that part of it!

The Backside Bigspin Kickflip is considered an advanced flat ground trick in Skateboarding. Before you learn this trick, we recommend you are able to Backside Bigspin, 360 Flip, and Varial Kickflip consistently. Of course, having Backside 180s, Pop Shove-Its, and your other basics down will help too. Let’s begin by defining the trick.

Backside Bigspin Kickflip Definition

Backside Bigspin Kickflips (a.k.a Bigspin Kickflips, or Big Flips) are achieved by combining a 360 Flip with a Backside Body Varial. It can also be defined as a Varial Kickflip combined with a Backside 180. The skateboard will do a 360 Flip while the rider rotates 180-degrees backside, landing and rolling away in switch stance.

With the help of professional Skateboarder Chris Chann, we put together a brief video tutorial on the Backside Bigspin Kickflip that you can watch below! We recommend you check out the tutorial before attempting to learn Big Flips on your own.

After you’ve had a chance to watch the video tutorial, be sure to read the rest of the information on this page for an in-depth analysis of the trick and how YOU can start landing Backside Bigspin Kickflips…FIRST TRY!

Backside Bigspin Kickflip Tutorial

We hope you enjoyed the video and learned a thing or two from it! If you’re still unsure about learning the Backside Bigspin Kickflip, don’t stress! We’ve got you covered.

We’ll be breaking down what we learned from the video. This step by step breakdown of the Backside Bigspin Kickflip will help clear up any issues you may be encountering with this trick. There are 5 important aspects of the Big Flip that you’ll need to know before you land your first one!

  1. Foot Position
  2. Back Foot Pop/Scoop
  3. Front Foot Flick/Follow Through
  4. Turning Your Shoulders/Practice Steps
  5. Landing Switch

Foot Position

The foot position for the Bigspin Kickflip very closely resembles the foot position you would use for a 360 Flip. After all, the board will be doing a 360 Flip. The only difference between the 360 Flip and the Big Flip is that your body will rotate 180-degrees in the same direction that the board is rotating.

To clarify, you’ll need your back foot to be placed on the tail of your skateboard. The ball of your back foot should be near the toe-side edge of the tail with your toes hanging slightly over the edge. You should be able to curl your toes over the toe-side edge of your tail from this position. Place your front foot in the middle of the board, slightly angled, just below the front bolts of your skateboard. 

Backside Bigspin Kickflip

Back Foot Pop/Scoop

For the Backside Bigspin Kickflip, the pop you’ll need is in between a scoop and a pop. In the words of Chris Chann, think of it like a “diagonal chop”. Try to avoid scooping too much, and avoid popping straight down with your back foot.

Somewhere in the middle of those two movements is where you’ll find the appropriate pop/scoop for the Bigspin Kickflip. If you have your regular Backside Bigspins down, you’ll notice the back foot pop/scoop motion is nearly identical for these two tricks.

Now we know to set our feet up like a 360 Flip, and to pop/scoop the board as we would for a Backside Bigspin.

Front Foot Flick/Follow Through

It’s time to turn this Bigspin into a Big Flip! The flicking motion required for the Backside Bigspin Kickflip is similar to the flicking motion for a Varial Kickflip.

The difference between the two flicking motions is that you’ll be turning your body as you flick for the Backside Bigspin. After you’ve popped the trick, when your body is turned about 90-degrees, this is when the front foot will flick off near the middle of the board on the heel-side. 

Once you’ve flicked off the board, your front foot needs to follow through with the flick and guide the board around for the landing. The same direction that your front foot flicks is the direction you’ll be turning with the board. Following through with the kick/flick of the front foot will help you finish rotating your body in order to catch the trick and ride away switch. 

Turning Your Shoulders

Since this is a “180-trick”, turning your shoulders is very key. Winding up your shoulders before you do the trick, then releasing the pressure as you begin to pop the Big Flip will not only help the board complete the required rotation but will also help YOU turn 180-degrees with the board.

One of the most common problems skateboarders have when learning Big Flips is slipping out on the landing. This happens when your shoulders haven’t turned all the way around with the board. It causes you to land on the board with your body slightly twisted, which doesn’t feel good. A solid wind up with your shoulders before you pop, and keeping your back straight can help eliminate this issue.

Another common error with Big Flips is when the board fails to flip properly. You may be experiencing this issue if you find yourself landing in primo or with the board flipped upside down when attempting Bigspin Kickflips. 

A great way to develop the muscle memory to properly form the Big Flip is to practice stepping off the board with your back foot and landing the trick with only your front foot.

Practice Steps

For this practice step, roll slowly on flat ground and pop the Big Flip. As you pop the trick, turn your shoulders, then plant your back foot safely on the ground as you follow the board around with your front foot. Finish by landing the Backside Bigspin Kickflip with only that front foot. Don’t worry about getting your back foot on there!

This is a practice step and should be used only to develop your muscle memory and dial in the Backside Bigspin Flip motion. This step should simplify the act of popping, flicking, and turning your shoulders simultaneously. Once you’ve mastered this step, you’ll be ready to commit and get both your feet to land on the board. FULL SEND! FIRST TRY!

Landing Switch

You’re almost there! The last step is to fully commit and get both of your feet on the board. You have to practice a lot and practice the motions that we said above. Once you’ve got all of that down, it’s just practicing and committing to the landing.

To recap, you’ll start with your feet in Big Flip position. The back foot will be half popping, half scooping with the ball of your back foot pushing down in the toe-side pocket of the tail. Scoop the board and as you begin to rotate your body Backside 180-degrees, your front foot will flick off the board like a Varial Flip, except your front foot follows through with the Backside 180 motion.

At this point, your shoulders will be turning with the board and your back foot will be coming around as your front foot gets ready to land on the board. When you learn this trick it helps to revert a little bit at the end. You’ll catch the board with your front foot if you plan on doing the slight revert.

Once you become more experienced with Backside Bigspin Kickflips, to get the full rotation in the air you’ll find yourself catching the board with either your back foot or both feet at the same time. Remember to bend your knees to absorb the impact, and roll away clean!

Make sure you are comfortable riding switch, as you’ll be landing in switch stance. Being comfortable with switch riding will help make your Backside Bigspin Kickflips as clean as possible. That’s all there is to it! With some practice and perseverance, you’ll be rolling away from Big Flips before you know it.

In Conclusion…

For the complete video breakdown of this trick, check out Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 6! SMS 6 is a complete advanced flip tricks tutorial, and the Bigspin Kickflip is the first trick that’s covered. With Christopher Chann and Aaron Kyro as your instructors, this video will help you master the advanced flip tricks.

Now get out there and have fun!!! We want to see YOU land this classic trick. Film a quick clip of you doing your best Big Flip and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding.  Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing Backside Bigspin Kickflips!

The Casper Flip is a difficult skateboarding trick that looks like pure magic to the untrained eye. Rumored to have been invented in the early 1990s by Rodney Mullen, the Casper Flip is a modern flip trick variation of a classic Freestyle Skateboarding trick, the “Casper”. The original Casper was invented by Bobby “Casper” Boyden in the late 1970s.

The Casper has many variations, a few of which you may have already heard of; the Casper Stall and the Casper Slide, for example. Before we jump into learning Casper Flips, let’s begin by going over the definition of a Casper Flip. 

Casper Flip Definition

Casper Flips are achieved by combining a half-Kickflip with a quick back foot scoop on the underside of the tail. This brings the skateboard around 180-degrees, right-side-up, and back under the skater’s feet. 

The Casper Flip is often confused with a similar-looking trick, called the Hospital Flip. The Hospital Flip is a different trick than the Casper Flip. Though the motion of the board is roughly the same, the Hospital Flip uses only the front foot to bring the skateboard back around and under the rider’s feet. The back foot just pops the board then lands back on it after the front foot half-flips the board and brings it back around.

During a Casper Flip, the back foot pop the tail down then quickly scoop the underside of the tail in mid-air to bring the skateboard back under the skater’s feet. It’s that small difference that could make a huge difference in a game of S.K.A.T.E!

Check out the video tutorial below that will teach you the steps Braille Skateboarding recommends for learning the Casper Flip. Once you’re finished watching, be sure to continue reading the rest of the information on this page!

We’ll be breaking down what we learned from the Casper Flip video tutorial and going over each step in greater detail so that YOU can start landing Casper Flips…FIRST TRY!

Casper Flip Tutorial

We hope you enjoyed that tutorial and that you learned something! We have some more tips and tricks for you, so stick around as we recap everything that was in the video above.

Before you attempt to learn this trick, we recommend you know how to Kickflip consistently. Since the Casper Flip involves half of a Kickflip, having solid Kickflips is very important for learning the trick. Once you have your Kickflips down, it helps to look at each part of the Casper Flip individually.

And as we’ve said before, this trick is an advanced trick. So while you should minimally have your Kickflips down, it’s worth knowing that you need to be really comfortable on your board and with flip tricks. This one in particular is rather bizarre, so make sure you have some intermediate tricks under your belt as well.

Enough Talk, Let’s Do This!

Below are the 5 essential parts of the Casper Flip.

  1. Foot Position
  2. Half-Flip Practice Step
  3. Landing
  4. Front Foot Lift
  5. Putting it All Together

Foot Position

Casper Flip

For the Casper Flip, place your feet in Kickflip position. Your front foot should be in the middle of the skateboard, just below the front bolts. Position the front foot at a 45-degree angle, as you would for a Kickflip. This foot placement is important as you’ll need to perform half of a Kickflip during the Casper Flip.

Your back foot should be on the tail in a similar stance to the Pop Shove It. The ball of your back foot should be closer to the toe-side edge of the tail, rather than the middle or heel-side edge of the tail. It’s very important to have your back foot perched on the ball of the foot. You will need to pop the tail fast, then scoop down in order to have the board complete the full rotation. Since this trick requires both speed and accuracy from your feet, how you position them for the Casper Flip is extremely important. 

Half-Flip Practice Step

Once you have your foot position figured out, we recommend using this first practice step to help you learn the Casper Flip. For this practice step, you will be popping the tail down and performing a half-kickflip. Simply pop the board, begin to flick off for the kickflip, but let the board come down with the grip tape side of the board resting on the shoelace side of your front foot.

Once you’ve popped the tail down for the half-kickflip, simply plant your back foot on the ground and let the board half-flip and land gently on top of your front foot with the grip tape facing the shoelaces.

Don’t try to land on your board, and try not to flick downwards for the half-kickflip. Practice this step repeatedly. After you’ve mastered this practice step, you can move on to the next one!

Landing in Casper

This practice step will be short and sweet. Perform the first practice step but instead of stepping off, land with your back foot on the tail of the board. Pop the tail down, flick the half-kickflip, and land on the board with your back foot on top of the underside of the tail, and your front foot underneath the board with the grip tape facing your shoelaces. That’s all there is to it!

Lifting the Front Foot

Begin this step where you left off from the second practice step. With the board upside down on the ground and your feet in the Casper position (front foot underneath, back foot on the tail), scoop down with your back foot while you lift up gently with your front foot. Essentially you are just flipping the board over.

Think of it as a Pop Shove-It with a half-flip. Requiring just a little bit of commitment, this is probably the easiest practice step for the Casper Flip. The downward scoop of your back foot combined with the upward lift of your front foot will cause the board to complete the Casper Flip motion. Remember to jump slightly with the board as you do these motions to get both your feet back on for the landing.

Casper Flip

Putting it All Together

You’ve mastered the 3 Casper Flip Practice Steps. Now it’s finally time to perform the motions in mid-air and land your first Casper Flip! Unfortunately, this is where things can become difficult. Obviously the higher you pop, the easier it will be to land the Casper Flip, but you shouldn’t focus too much on popping a huge ollie.

Your focus should be on moving your feet very quickly. Pop the tail down, begin to flick the half-kickflip with your front foot but leave it under the board, then quickly scoop down and backward on the tail with your back foot. This will rotate the board around 180-degrees and half-flip it back under your feet. Bend your knees to absorb the impact and roll away clean!


We hope you enjoyed that! If you’re interested in learning other advanced tricks, check out Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 6! It goes over so many tricks in complete detail, so you don’t need to figure it out. Some tricks that are included are Double Kickflip, Big Spin Kickflip, Nightmare Flip and Gazelle Flip. You CAN learn to skate, and Skateboarding Made Simple is your roadmap!

Show us your best Casper Flips! We want to see YOU land this trick! Film a quick clip of you doing your best Casper Flip and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding.  Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing Casper Flips. Now get out there, keep progressing, and have some fun! 

Are you ready to learn how to do a laser flip? I rarely see this trick being done well or at all. Most of the time when I ask people if they can do a laser flip they say “oh that trick is too hard” or “it takes so much energy from my legs”. I can tell you from experience that this trick requires you to know some complex steps and tricks before trying to learn/master this beast of a trick.

Now how exactly do you do a laser flip and what is a laser flip? You perform a laserflip by combining a 360 frontside shuvit and varial heelflip together. It was invented by Rodney Mullen, the same guy that invented the ollie.

The laser flip is a difficult trick. If you haven’t mastered the varial heelflip and 360 frontside shuvit, go back and learn those first. This trick will also take a lot of practice. Remember to not give up. You can do it!

The “Sweet Spot”

The tricky part about learning this trick is finding the “sweet spot” and the right balance of shuvit and flick to make it stay under your feet, rotate, and then so you can catch the board.

What is a “sweet spot”? By sweet spot I mean the foot position. This varies between each person but the most common position I’ve seen, is having your front foot in the center of the board pointing straight ahead with most of your heel being on it and your toes hanging off the side of your board.

Now for the back foot. It’s very similar to a heelflip or varial heelflip, you’ll want to have to have your foot on the pocket of the tail with your toes pointing away from the board (have them pointing to the right if you’re regular footed or to the left if you’re goofy footed) at a 45-degree angle.

Practice steps

There are some steps and tricks required to learning this trick. The first and most important is a varial heelflip. Why is it important to know this trick? Well it’s the best trick to know before trying to laser flip.

It’s the same thing as trying to learning how to kickflip or heelflip without being able to ollie, balance, or being comfortable riding a skateboard. Once you’re able to varial heelflip easily enough to land it 8/10 times, it will condition your body to know how to land a “smaller” and “easier” version of a laserflip.

The timing

Now let’s talk about the timing and finding the right balance of flick and shuv. This is a huge and common problem when I see people trying this trick out. Most of the time I see people flicking too hard, not flicking hard enough, or not giving the shuvit part enough power. These two are definitely the hardest parts of mastering this trick.

First of all, the timing is weird. For example, when you’re doing a kickflip all you think about is popping, flicking, waiting for the board to flip, and catch the board. But for this one you’ll have to wait for the board to start rotating. Once it reaches a 90-degree angle, that’s the moment where you flick.

Flicking the back foot

Similar to a treflip (360 kickflip) this trick is actually more in the back foot and shuvit than the flick and front foot. Give more power to the back foot and get used to getting the board rotating 360-degrees. The best way to practice this is by stepping off the board with both feet the moment you shuv the board.

Keep practicing that part and once you’ve got it down try to land a 360 font shuvit with one foot and stepping off with your back foot the moment you get it to rotate have your back foot on the ground then catch the board with your front foot. Then once you feel comfortable with that step you add the heelflip to the mix.

This will help you get your muscles used to the amount of power used for the trick as well for the timing. The same routine is used here, step off with the back foot and land it with your front foot until you feel comfortable doing this.

Common problems

There are also plenty of small but very important problems that people look over when trying to learn laser flips.

Wrong foot positioning

For example, your feet could be too close together when setting for the trick and trying to catch the board. The best way to fix this is experimenting with foot placement.

It’s just like anything in life, if mimicking someone’s method doesn’t work then just use what you learned and try to figure out your way of doing things. Keep tweaking your placement until you start to see it stay underneath your feet. Then after that all that’s left is landing the trick.

Another example would be the board flying behind you when trying to catch it. You may be jumping forward instead of going straight up. That’s a simple thing to fix, just try to consciously make yourself jump straight up when trying to land the trick.

Also, when flicking, you’ll want to bend your front ankle and flick in the direction of the rotation instead of flicking forward and in front of you. If you don’t, you’ll most likely end up slowing down or straight up cancelling the rotation. This goes with the step of finding the right balance between flick and shuv.

Speed

One more thing that seems pretty scary but it makes it a lot easier is going fast. This especially helpful when doing laser flips on flatground. Practicing the basics is also very helpful. Like doing a few front shuvits and varial heelflips before getting into the battle that is laser flips. 

Practice!

Finally, all you have to do is practice all these steps and combine them to get both the rotation and flip for the trick, keep pushing forward, never give up, and eventually with some time you’ll be able to laser flip like its nothing.

It may take weeks or even months but once you get this down it’ll be worth all that time. Maybe someday when you’ve mastered this, you’ll be able to take it off drops, stairs, in and out of grind/slides.

Laser Flip Tutorial

Huge thanks to Chris Chann for doing this tutorial on our Channel! Be sure to check him out on Instagram and YouTube.

Show us your best laser flip! We want to see you landing these tricks from all over the world. Film a quick clip of you doing your best frontside heelflip and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate and #brailleskate.  Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing this awesome trick!

If you want to learn some other tricks, be sure to check out the rest of our blog. You should also pick up Skateboarding Made Simple 1-7! They go over everything like learning how to ride, ollie, kickflip, slides and grinds, skatepark basics, mini ramp basics and other advanced flatground tricks. You CAN learn to skate, and that’s the entire purpose of Skateboarding Made Simple.

Originally invented by Rodney Mullen, the Ollie Impossible is an advanced skateboarding trick that, despite its name, is certainly possible to land. We’re here to teach YOU how to do the Ollie Impossible!

There are many variations of this trick, including the Front Foot Impossible, which has been popularized in recent years by Skateboarding phenom Andy Anderson. Before you get into those (or any variation of the trick), it’s important to first know your basics.

You should have all the tricks from Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1 down! These tricks are:

  • Ollie
  • Frontside 180
  • Backside 180
  • Pop Shove It
  • Frontside Shove It
  • Heelflip
  • Kickflip

Some skateboarders will tell you that knowing how to Pressure Flip will help with the Ollie Impossible. Although there is some truth to that, if you don’t know how to Pressure Flip, you will still be able to learn the Ollie Impossible.

As with any trick, it’s important to know what you’re actually learning. So, let’s start by looking at the definition of the trick.

Ollie Impossible Definition

Ollie Impossibles, also known simply as Impossibles, are similar to 360 Shove-Its in that the board rotates 360-degrees. However, Ollie Impossibles are performed when the skateboard is wrapped almost vertically over the back foot while in the air, resulting in a 360-degree rotation of the board. 

Included below are two helpful tutorials that show different styles of Ollie Impossibles. The first video features Braille Skateboarding’s Aaron Kyro, and the second video features Professional Skateboarder, Jonny Giger, who is a beloved friend to us here at Braille! We recommend that you watch both of these videos before trying to get out there and learn Impossibles by yourself!

After you’ve watched the video tutorials, read the information that follows for an in-depth analysis of the trick and before you know it, you’ll be landing Impossibles…FIRST TRY!

Ollie Impossible Tutorials

We hope you enjoyed the video tutorials and that you now have a clear idea of how to do Ollie Impossibles. We know you must be eager to, but before you start practicing them you should read over the information on this page to really familiarize yourself with the trick.

Knowing all the steps will help you learn the trick fast and you’ll be giving all your friends a letter during games of S.K.A.T.E in no time! Now, let’s review what we learned from these video tutorials and break this trick down!

  1. Foot Position
  2. Wrapping the Back Foot
  3. Wrapping the Back Foot While Riding
  4. Assisted-Impossible Practice Step
  5. Putting It All Together

Foot Position

For the Ollie Impossible, place your front foot near the middle of the board, just below the front bolts. Slightly angle your foot, similar to the front foot position of a Kickflip or Pop Shove-It. The front foot’s only job is to stay out of the way of the board. This allows the board to wrap around the back foot, then stomp the bolts for the landing.

Your back foot’s position on the skateboard is much more important for the Ollie Impossible since it will be doing most of the work. Place your back foot near the middle of the tail, with your toes hanging over the edge quite a bit. Your back foot’s heel shouldn’t be hanging off the board too much, if at all. That heel should almost be lined up flush with the heel-side edge of the tail.

Ollie Impossible Foot Position

Wrapping the Back Foot

For this practice step, stand still on flat ground with your front foot off of the skateboard. With your back foot in the Ollie Impossible position, scoop the board down and wrap it around your back foot. The board should stay attached to the back foot as it wraps around, and you’ll land with your back foot on the bolts near the tail.

Your front foot is planted on the ground behind the board for the entire duration of this practice step, so don’t worry about trying to get your front foot on the board. This step is designed to get your back foot used to the motion of wrapping the board around your foot, which will develop your muscle memory for the Ollie Impossible. 

Ollie Impossible

Wrapping the foot while riding

Naturally, the second practice step builds off of the first practice step for the Ollie Impossible. For this practice step, set up in the Ollie Impossible position and ride with a little speed. While riding, pop the board down and scoop the Impossible with your back foot while stepping off and planting your front foot safely on the ground.

Wrap the board around your back foot, land on the bolts, then quickly step back on with your front foot to continue riding forward. Remember to keep your back foot attached to the skateboard as much as possible during the wrap, because the back foot is the point of control for the board.

You’re going to use your back foot to put your board where you want it to go! Once you’re really comfortable popping the trick while riding and stepping off with your front foot, there is one last practice step you can use to dial in the back foot wrap and keeping your front foot in the air before landing back on the board.

Assisted-Impossible

For this practice step you’ll stay stationary. You will need something at about chest height or slightly lower to hang on to. Place your feet in the Ollie Impossible position, but hold on to whatever is in front of you, like a railing. From here, perform the Impossible, wrapping the board around your back foot while jumping in the air. Keep your front foot out of the way, then get it back on the board once it has wrapped around your back foot and landed back on the ground.

Ollie Impossible Practice Step

Holding on to the railing in front of you allows you to float in the air above to board for a bit longer than you would when popping the trick without any assistance. This will get your front foot used to staying above the board rather than planting down while your back foot does the work.

Once you can land some Impossibles while holding on to a railing, barrier, etc, you’ll be ready to perform the Ollie Impossible while rolling unassisted! 

Putting it all together

You’ve mastered the practice steps, you can land Assisted-Impossibles, so there’s only one thing left to do! It’s time to commit.

It may feel quite a bit different when you don’t have something to hold on to, and you may not know exactly how to distribute your weight.  The majority of your weight needs to be on the back foot. Your front foot should only be weighted enough to keep your front wheels on the ground.

A common mistake people make when trying to learn Impossibles is scooping the board backward. You will need to scoop the board toward the direction that you’re rolling. If you scoop the board backward, the board will end up doing a 360 Pop Shove-It.

With your back foot really weighted, you’re going to elevate your front foot and scoop forward with your back foot. The board will begin to wrap around your foot, your front foot will stay up and out of the way, then you’ll pull your foot back.

Make sure your front foot doesn’t interrupt the Impossible, and place it back on the board once it wraps all the way around. Bend your knees to absorb the impact and roll away clean!

If you find yourself landing with both feet near the nose, you aren’t pulling back enough with your back foot to complete the wrap. Pull your back foot back enough to get it on the bolts near the tail of the board.

Overview

To recap: Scoop forward, wrap, pull back, put your front foot on, then roll away clean. If you’ve learned the Ollie Impossible step by step, with some practice and perseverance you’ll be able to combine the steps and land proper Ollie Impossibles confidently and consistently. 


And that’s all there is to it! Finally, we want to see YOU land this classic trick! Film a quick clip of you doing your best Ollie Impossible and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding. Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing Impossibles. Now get out there, keep progressing, and have fun!

Are you ready to take your skateboarding to the next level and learn one of the most beautiful flat ground tricks in all of skateboarding? Well, ready or not, we’re here to teach you how to master the 360 flip. It was invented by Rodney Mullen in the 1980s, but truly popularized by Jason Lee in the mid 90’s.

The 360 Flip is an iconic trick that skateboarders all over the world know and love. When you see a clean, well executed 360 Flip, it just makes you want to get on your board and skate. If you’re new to skateboarding, it’ll make you want to learn it.

We receive a lot of Skate Supports for 360 Flips. Most of the barriers and problems we see are covered in this post. So if you get through this post and need some extra assistance, send us a Skate Support! We’ll be more than happy to help you with that as well!

If you want to start learning this trick you should be able to Kickflip and have all of your other basic tricks down. You should minimally have all tricks from Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1 mastered! Before we get to the tutorial, it’s important to know the definition of the 360 flip.

360 Flip Definition

360 Kickflip, or 360 Flips, are achieved by combining the 360 Shove-it and Kickflip as one spin/flip trick.

Also known as 3-Flips, Tre-Flips, Trè, etc…

Seems simple enough right? Well, once you get the hang of them, they can feel very easy! Getting to that point, however, will take some practice and persistence.

Below is a video tutorial that will cover the fine details of this trick. After you’ve watched the video, read the information that follows to make sure you’re fully prepared to go out there and start landing 360 Flips!

360 Flip Tutorial

We hope you enjoyed the tutorial and that you gained some insight on how to do a 360 Flip. Let’s go over the material from the video and recap what we learned to really drill those 360 Flip mechanics into your head.  When learning the 360 Flip, it helps to go over these 5 crucial steps:

  1. Foot Position
  2. Body Position
  3. Back Foot Scoop
  4. Front Foot Flick
  5. Landing

Foot Position

For the 360 Flip, place your front foot on the board and position it just like you would for a Kickflip. Place your back foot at the end of the tail with your toes hanging over the edge of your board. The most important part of this trick is the back foot scoop, so be sure to have the proper positioning for your back foot.

360 Flips

Body Position

A common mistake that a lot of skateboarders make when learning the 360 Flip is leaning too far forward. This will cause you to land either in front of your board, or on the nose end of your board. The best way to correct this is to make sure you have the proper body position before you pop the 360 Flip.

It’s important to be slightly leaning back. When you’re leaning back while popping the 360 Flip, your board will shoot out in front of you, so you can land and ride away clean. Make sure you keep your back straight, lean back slightly, and have your shoulders opened up like you would for a Kickflip.

Now that you’ve got the proper posture and foot position for the 360 Flip, it’s time to learn how to make the magic happen… That’s right. The back foot scoop.

Back foot scoop

It really is true when people say the key to the 360 Flip is in the back foot. With your toes hanging over the edge of the board, you will need to give the board a very hard scoop.  It’s very important to have your weight on your back foot. If you have your weight on your back foot you’re going to be able to get that powerful scoop. The majority of your power is going into your back foot which is exactly what you need to scoop that board and make it do the 360 rotation.

You can practice by standing next to your board and placing your back foot in 360 Flip position. Now, simply pop the board into a 360 motion. It doesn’t matter if the board flips or only spins, this practice step is just to get you to work on the scoop with your back foot. This step will teach you the importance of slightly curling the toes of your back foot around the edge of the tail while strongly scooping to get the proper rotation. 

Front foot flick

Do not focus too much on the front foot! This can cause you to over flip or under spin your 360 Flips. While the majority of the work is done with the back foot, the front foot only needs to lightly flick the board in a Kickflip motion.

You won’t be flicking directly off the nose of the board like you would with a traditional Kickflip. Try flicking more off the side of it as it begins spinning from your scoop. You’ll see in any footage of a 360 Flip that the front foot is not very engaged during this trick. It just gently flicks off the board to help it flip fully during the 360-degree rotation.

During most of this trick, your front foot will just be floating above the board waiting to catch it. That’s exactly where you want it. Again, emphasize on that back foot scoop while your front foot does a light upwards flick and stays over the board.

Landing

If you’ve kept your back straight, leaned back slightly with your back foot mostly weighted, scooped hard, and flicked lightly, you should be able to land this trick pretty easily. It should be as easy as catching the board with the front foot, extending that back knee and getting your back foot on the board. After that, roll away clean!

Remember that while you do all of these steps, you’ll need to jump with and stay over your skateboard. It sounds like it should be easy but it will take lots of practice and hard work.

Once you are used to all the motions, spotting the board and catching it with your front foot will become easier.  With some perseverance and all of the great Braille Skateboarding resources we have to offer, you’ll be rolling away clean from 360 flips in no time. 

In Conclusion

 The 360 Flip is one of the featured tricks in Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 5. SMS 5 primarily focuses intermediate flatground tricks. It is the most useful skateboarding tutorial series ever made. It uses Aaron’s extremely detailed and successful approach to teaching skating. You will learn each trick fast and in the correct order. Get this video now and take your skating to the next level!

Lastly, we want to see your best 360 Flip! Film a quick clip of landing your best 360 Flip then post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding.  Let us know what helped you the most so we can highlight that and can get everyone landing 360 Flips!

Looking for some other tricks to learn? Check out our Skateboarding Trick Guide! You’ll find more detailed blog posts there on other tricks covered in Skateboarding Made Simple!

The Frontside Bigspin is often considered an intermediate or advanced trick, mostly done by the pros or sponsored skateboarders. Way too hard for a beginner or novice right? WRONG! We’re here to tell you that not only you but, anyone can learn how to Frontside Bigspin! All it takes is some practice and perseverance.

We can walk you through Frontside Bigspins to help you finally unlock them. Even if you only know your basic skateboarding tricks, you’ll be able to land them! All you’ll really need to know to be able to Frontside Bigspin is Frontside Pop Shove-Its and Frontside 180s. If you are pretty consistent with those two basic tricks, the Frontside Bigspin is well within your ability!

Having all the tricks from Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1 mastered really helps. More than anything, you need to be completely comfortable on your board. By this point, you should have those tricks down and have a good feel for your board. So keep going, keep practicing and land this trick!

Before we go any further, let’s define the Frontside Bigspin. It’s important to know and understand the trick you’re attempting.

Frontside Bigspin Definition

Frontside Bigspins are achieved by combining the Frontside 180 and 360 Frontside Shove It as one spin trick.

Although the motion the board does during a Frontside Bigspin is a Frontside 360 Shove-It, you will not need to learn how to do Frontside 360 Shoves to be able to Frontside Bigspin. Think of this trick as if you were doing a Frontside Pop Shove It, catching it, then turning frontside 180. As long as you have solid Frontside Shove Its and Frontside 180s, you’ll be able to land this trick in no time. 

Frontside Big Spin Tutorial (from Ride)

We hope you enjoyed the brief video tutorial on Frontside Bigspins. We’re going to go over everything in greater detail for you to really understand how the Frontside Bigspin works. There are 4 crucial steps to the Frontside Bigspin:

  1. Foot Position
  2. Back Foot Snap
  3. Turning Your Shoulders
  4. Landing Switch

This trick takes a lot of practice and commitment. So when you’re out there skating, don’t give up! You’ll be able to land it soon enough. Now, let’s get into the trick!

Foot Position

The foot position for the Frontside Bigspin is very important. Your back foot is the most important one here. The power from your back foot is the most critical parts of performing a Frontside Bigspin.

For the FS Bigspin, place your front foot near the front bolts of the skateboard, just before the bolts but quite close to them. Your toes should be hanging off the edge slightly, almost like you would for a Heelflip. Place your back foot in the heel-side corner pocket of the tail. Your heel should be angled towards your front foot instead of pointing straight back. This should be at about a 45 degree angle.

Having your back foot angled in the heel-side corner pocket of the tail will allow you to snap the board down to pop the trick while still giving you the full 360-degree rotation required to be set up for a clean landing.

Back Foot Snap

When it comes to Frontside Bigspins, all the magic happens with the back foot. Your front foot does nothing but stay over the board waiting to catch it. It’s ALL in the back foot. With your back foot in the proper FS Bigspin position, snap the board down as hard as possible. If you scoop the board too much instead of snap, the board will likely flip on you and you won’t be able to land the trick.

When you’ve snapped the tail down for the FS Bigspin, give the board a small nudge forward with your back foot. This will keep the board from rotating behind you so you won’t land in front of the board.

Remember, it’s basically the same technique as the Frontside Pop Shove-It, just with a little more force. When you are first learning this trick, getting the full rotation will be the most difficult part. If this is the case, you can land on the nose of the board and pivot it around to complete the rotation.

Another helpful tip for achieving the full rotation when learning the FS Bigspin is to take the trick down a curb or small ledge. This will give you the extra hang-time needed to rotate the board and the full 360-degrees. Once you land those, it will give you a good basis to eventually get the full rotation on flat ground.

Turning Your Shoulders

While still looking forward (the direction you are traveling), before popping the FS Bigspin your shoulders should be turned slightly. This is to wind up for the Frontside 180 that your body will need to do. This technique is almost identical to the shoulder turning technique used for a regular Frontside 180.

Wind your shoulders and as you snap the board down and nudge it forward with your back foot, begin to turn your shoulders for a frontside 180. If you’ve popped the trick high enough you’ll be able to catch the board with your front foot as it comes around. Then, it should simply complete the rotation in the air.

If the trick is staying lower to the ground, you can turn with the board as it spins. Then pivot off the nose with your front foot once the board has come to about 270-degrees to finish the rotation.

Landing Switch

When you land a Frontside Bigspin, you’re going to be rolling away switch. Because of this, you should practice riding around switch as a warm up. This way, you won’t have the problem of being uncomfortable landing when you’ve got the whole rotation of the trick down.

It’s important to be comfortable with riding around switch for this reason. It will help make your Frontside Bigspins look cleaner and you’ll roll away from them more often. Again, if you’re having trouble landing Frontside Bigspins, you can take them off a curb for some extra hang-time.

Another way to make Frontside Bigspins a little easier to land is to try doing them over a hip. This will allow you to slightly under-rotate the FS Bigspin while still rolling away clean, and switch. This should help give you the confidence to commit to landing the Frontside Bigspin on flat ground. 

In Conclusion

If you want to learn other tricks like this, check out Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 5! SMS 5 covers intermediate flatground tricks and dives into deep detail into every trick. It covers other intermediate tricks like the Tre Flip, Hard Flip, Varial Heelflip and the Inward Flip. If you want to take your skateboarding to the next step, check out the Skateboarding Made Simple Series!

Finally, we want to see your best Frontside Bigspin! Film a quick clip of you landing a FS Bigspin then post it on Instagram, tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding. Let us know which part helped you the most so we can highlight that and get everyone landing Frontside Bigspins. Now get out there, master your FS Bigspins, and have fun!

Looking for other tricks to land? Check out our Skateboarding Trick Guide! This page has detailed blog posts for every trick on there, so you’ll know exactly how to do each and every trick. If you’re starting from the beginning, we have all the tricks from Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1. If you’re looking for more advanced tricks, there are tricks from Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 5 as well. No matter what level you’re at in skateboarding, there’s something there for you. GO OUT AND SKATE!

Have you learned Fakie Bigspins but are struggling to learn them in your regular stance? The good news is, you are not alone! Many skateboarders will learn the basic trick, “Fakie Bigspin”, then spend months or even years before they learn how to Backside Bigspin in their regular stance.

We’re here to tell you that Backside Bigspins aren’t anything to be afraid of, and it’s about time you start to learn them! Before we get into the details, let’s start by defining the Backside Bigspin.

Backside Bigspin Definition

Backside Bigspins are achieved by combining the Backside 180 and 360 Shove It as one spin trick.

For the most in-depth video on the Backside Bigspin, we strongly recommend picking up a copy of Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 5. Using Aaron’s extremely detailed and successful approach to teaching skating, you will learn Backside Bigspins. Most importantly, you’ll learn them the proper way and have them down in no time.

Don’t have a copy of SMS 5 yet? No worries. Check out the brief video tutorial below to learn the theory behind the Backside Bigspin. In the video below, Aaron demonstrates the proper way to learn Backside Bigspins. He breaks the trick down into many parts so it’s easy to understand.

After you’ve reviewed the video, read the rest of the blog post to find more tips and tricks to fully master it.

Backside Bigspin Tutorial

We hope you enjoyed the video and have learned something from it! Below, you will see all aspects of the tricks and see all the steps. This way, you’ll be able to really get familiar with it so you can go on and add it to your trick arsenal.

Steps to the Backside Bigspin

  1. Tricks You Should Know
  2. Foot Position
  3. Practice Steps
  4. Pop, Scoop, Turn
  5. Landing

Tricks You Should Know

Before you learn Backside Bigspins, it’s extremely important to have your Pop Shove-Its and Backside 180s down. You should have these tricks consistent and clean, as they both play a huge role in the Backside Bigspin. It helps to know how to 360 Pop Shove-It as well, but it’s not completely necessary.

If you do know how to 360 Pop Shove-It, you’ll notice many similarities to the Backside Bigspin, especially in the practice steps. As long as you know Pop Shove-Its and Backside 180s though, you should be able to learn Backside Bigspins.

Foot Position

Backside Bigspin

The foot position for a Backside Bigspin is another important factor when learning this trick. Not so much the front foot, but the back foot will be the main focus. Position your front foot slightly angled near the middle of the board, below the front bolts, Your back foot should be placed on tip of the tail with the toes barely hanging over the edge.

Although not quite like a 360 flip, you’ll want your back foot set up with your toes slightly hanging off the edge to be able to scoop hard and achieve the full 360-degree rotation required for the Backside Bigspin. 

Practice Steps

The first practice step we teach you for this trick will help you get used to the proper motion needed for the Bigspin. However, once you have learned this practice step, we recommend you do learn the proper way to Bigspin and don’t get in the habit of only doing Backside Bigspins using the practice step method.

For this step, do a Pop Shove-It. When landing the Pop Shove-It, catch the front end or nose of your board with your front foot, then pivot the Backside 180 off your nose and roll away switch. Your shoulders should be turned backside around 90-degrees when you catch the Pop Shove-It, then you just bring your back foot around to continue the rotation, pivoting the Backside 180 off the nose.

This is a very good step for helping you understand the Bigspin motion before you start popping the whole trick in the air. The main takeaway from this practice step is to get used to moving your shoulders and turning your upper body with the Pop Shove-It as your body rotates 180-degrees.

The next step is to work on the back foot pop/scoop. For this step, stand off of your board with your front foot and practice scooping the tail using your back foot to achieve a 360 Shove-It motion. The secret to this trick is getting good at that 360 Shove-It scoop motion and turning your shoulders with the board. When you turn your shoulders with the board, your feet will follow.

Pop, Scoop, Turn

Now that you’ve figured out your foot position and have mastered the practice steps, it’s time to put in the work and commit to this trick! Set up, bend your knees and pop the board. Scoop the 360 Shove-It and turn your shoulders with the board. Your feet will follow suit, then once you’ve fully rotated in the air, catch the board with your front foot.

Like a Pop Shove-It or 360 Pop Shove-It, your front foot stays with the board the entire time. Again, having those basic tricks dialed in will give you an advantage when learning the Backside Bigspin.  Remember, scoop that back foot hard and turn with the board.

Landing

Since you’ll be landing in the switch position, it’s important to be comfortable with riding switch! After all, to land this trick you will need to roll away switch. By this point, you should already be comfortable riding switch, but if you’re not practice this. Ride around in switch and do some backside 180s. You definitely don’t want to be playing around with this trick and not landing it because you don’t know how to ride in switch.

Landing the Backside Bigspin comes down to catching that Pop Shove-It in the air and bringing it around 180 degrees to land switch. If you aren’t catching the board at first, don’t stress. The catch will come as you get comfortable with the trick. Focus on fully rotating the board and not relying on the pivot.

Trust that your body will turn in the air and spot your landing! Bend your knees to brace the impact, roll away switch, and BOOM! You landed a Backside Bigspin FIRST TRY!


In Conclusion…

If you’re new to skateboarding, we have everything you need to help you progress. We have skateboards, accessories and, of course, Skateboarding Made Simple.

Our full tutorial, Skateboarding Made Simple, is a unique approach to learning to skate created by expert instructor Aaron Kyro. The full lesson plan Volume 1-7 will take you from beginning to advanced skating!

It is the most detailed tutorial series for skateboarding ever made. With 7 volumes, teaching you all different kinds of skate tricks, you’ll be able to progress even faster. In SMS 5, you will learn how to do the Backside Bigspin and many other intermediate flat-ground tricks. It will take your skating to the next level.

Show us your best Backside Bigspins! We want to see YOU land this classic trick! Film a quick clip of you doing your best Backside Bigspin and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding

Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing Backside Bigspins. Now get out there and have fun!

The 360 Pop Shove It is a difficult trick to learn. If you’ve been having trouble with them, don’t worry. You’re not alone! After all, Braille Skateboarding considers the 360 Pop Shove It an intermediate or even an advanced trick. It’s a fantastic trick for a game of S.K.A.T.E and even some of the most talented skateboarders will take a letter from a well-executed 360 Pop Shove It.

No wonder you want to learn how to do them! Before we get into the details, it’s important to know the definition of a 360 Pop Shove It.

360 Pop Shove It Definition

360 Pop Shove its are achieved by adding an extra 180 spin to the Pop Shove it, making the board spin a full 360-degrees while your body stays neutral above the skateboard.

Going Back to the Basics

You’re going to want to have your basics down before attempting the 360 Pop Shove It. You will definitely need to know how to Pop Shove It. If you’ve been progressing using Skateboarding Made Simple, you should have all the tricks from SMS 1, as well as most of the tricks from SMS 5.

The 360 Pop Shove It is within the realm of SMS Volume 5, which covers intermediate flatground tricks. So, if that’s where you’re currently at with your skateboarding, you are ready to tackle this classic trick!

Check out this super helpful tutorial below to get an in-depth look at the 360 Pop Shove It. You’ll learn Aaron Kyro’s “secret” that helped him unlock this trick and more tips to get you landing 360 Pop Shove Its FIRST TRY.

After you watch the video, be sure to read the rest of blog post to really drill those 360 Pop Shove It mechanics into your head!

360 Pop Shove-It Tutorial

We hope you enjoyed the video tutorial and that it helps you land your first 360 Pop Shove It! We are going to review the most important points from the video and breakdown all the steps for you.

The more you familiarize yourself with the small details and little intricacies of this trick, the better your chances are for landing them clean and consistent. So take notes! (Yes, taking mental notes works just fine.) 

Here’s a quick breakdown of the 5 crucial steps you’ll be learning.

  1. Foot Position
  2. Body Position
  3. Practice Step #1
  4. Practice Step #2
  5. Landing

1. Foot Position

For this one, start by placing your front foot in the middle of the board, just before the front bolts of the skateboard. It should be positioned the same way you would position your front foot for a Pop Shove It or a Kickflip.

360 pop shove it

Having your front foot positioned similar to a Pop Shove It or Kickflip will work just fine for the 360 Pop Shove It, though you may want a little bit more of your front foot on the board. It will be acting as a guide/failsafe for this trick, so having a decent amount of your front foot on the board will help.

The back foot should be placed right on the tip of the tail of the skateboard, with the ball of that foot applying pressure to the center of the tail. You don’t want your toes hanging off the board much, if at all. This may cause your board to begin to flip like a 360 Flip.

The back foot should be placed right on the tip of the tail of the skateboard, with the ball of that foot applying pressure to the center of the tail. You don’t want your toes hanging off the board much, if at all. This may cause your board to begin to flip like a 360 Flip.

You may find yourself landing this trick in Primo position (landing on the trucks) or with the board upside down. If this is happening, it’s important to make sure your toes aren’t hanging off the board. Once again, that back foot should be on the tip of the tail, with the ball of your foot applying pressure straight down into the center of the tail. 

2. Body Position

For this trick, you should be standing on the board the same way you would for a regular Pop Shove It. That is, with your shoulders parallel with the board. For the 360 flip, your chest is facing more toward the nose with your shoulders more opened up.

This differs from the 360 Pop Shove It since you should be more lined up with the bolts, with your chest more or less facing the same direction your toes are. The photo below shows Aaron’s posture and body position just before he pops..

360 pop shove it

2. Practice Step #1

For the first practice step, you’re going to have your back foot on the tail in the proper position as we mentioned above. Your front foot will be off the board, standing on the ground just behind your board. From here, use your back foot to pop straight down with a slight backward scooping motion to get the board to spin 360-degrees. Try to keep the board flat and spin it around using only your back foot.

If you aren’t able to keep the board flat with just your back foot, and it keeps going into Primo position or landing upside down, don’t stress out! It’s not that big of a deal, just do your best to keep the board flat as it rotates. The next practice step will keep your board from flipping, so it’s not the end of the world if the board isn’t staying completely level for this first practice step. Once again, just try your best!

4. Practice Step #2

After you’ve mastered that first practice step, it’s time to move on to the final practice step. For this one, you will set both your feet up on the board in the foot position. Pop the trick but leave your front foot on the board as the board rotates.

This time you’ll be stepping off with your back foot after you’ve popped the trick and land the it with only your front foot. It’s simple! Pop it, scoop it, step off with your back foot and leave that front foot on. 

For the 360 Pop-Shove It, your front foot acts as a failsafe. If your front foot remains flat on the board, the board will not flip on you! That’s why it’s not a huge deal if you are struggling to keep the board flat during Practice Step #1. When you are performing the trick you’ll have your front foot on there to keep the board level.

Once you’ve gotten the hang of Practice Step #2, putting everything together to land the 360 Pop Shove-It should be easy for you!

5. Landing

After you’ve popped the 360 Pop Shove-It, all you will need to do to land is bend your back knee. This is allowing the board to rotate under your feet, so you can land! From here, simply extend your back knee, land on the bolts and ride away clean. 

Congratulations! You’ve just landed a 360 Pop Shove It. Have fun giving your friends a letter in games of S.K.A.T.E and be sure to push yourself! Try taking this trick down a set of stairs or a gap once you’ve mastered them on flat ground.


At BrailleSkateboarding.com we have everything you need to help you progress. Our full tutorial Skateboarding Made Simple is a unique approach to learning to skate created by expert instructor Aaron Kyro. The full lesson plan Volume 1-7 will take you from beginning to advanced skating in no time.

Show us your best 360 Pop Shove Its! We want to see 360 Pop Shove Its from all over the world. Film a quick clip of you doing your best one and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate, #brailleskate, and #brailleskateboarding.

Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing 360 Pop Shove Its!

Frontside Heelflip Definition

Before we get started, what is a frontside heelflip? It’s simply a frontside 180 with a heelflip, and is also known as a frontside 180 heelflip. It’s a simple trick that combines both of these tricks together but there are some things that make it difficult.

First things first…

Before you get to this trick, there are a few others you need to learn. Here’s that list:

  • Riding and pushing
  • Ollie
  • Pop Shuvit
  • Frontside 180
  • Backside 180
  • Frontside Shuvit
  • Backside Shuvit
  • Kickflip
  • Heelflip

As you may have noticed, Braille teaches skateboarding on a step by step basis. When learning this trick specifically, it’s important to learn these in order so you know you can control your board.

The most important tricks are your frontside 180s and heelflips. If you don’t have these down, the trick is still possible to learn but it’ll be a million times harder. It’s self explanatory why these two are the most important, but nonetheless, you should get all tricks in Skateboarding Made Simple Volume 1 down first.

Foot placement

The foot placement is one of the most important parts of this trick. You want to have your front foot (left foot if you’re regular and right foot if you’re goofy) in the heelflip position.

As a reminder, the foot position for the heelflip is as follows. Your front foot is about the same distance up the board as an Ollie or Kickflip, but instead you are going to have your toes hanging off the board. The back foot is going to want to be in the pocket of your tail closer to the side your heel is and you are going to want to stand on the balls of your foot. You should have your back foot should be slightly angled with your heel turned a few degrees toward your front foot. 

The back foot (right foot if you’re regular and left foot if you’re goofy) is really simple. You want it to be in the frontside 180 position which is, right on the corner/edge of the tail. Here are some images showing the foot placements for both regular and goofy stances.

frontside heelflip

Body Position

The other important thing when doing this trick is your shoulders. When doing an Ollie, you keep your shoulders straight and parallel to your skateboard but when it comes to a frontside 180 you wind up your shoulders before you pop your board up. This creates that momentum you need to spin the 180-degrees. Setting up and winding your shoulders right is very important to this and any 180 tricks.

Most of the work for this trick goes into the shoulders. So how do you set and wind them up? You’re going to have your front shoulder (left shoulder if your regular or right shoulder if your goofy) in front of your chest. As for the back shoulder, (right shoulder if you’re regular or left shoulder if you’re goofy) have it to the side of your body and slightly dipped down. This helps create the power you’ll need to rotate your upper body.

Once you’ve got your shoulders and feet set up properly the next thing is winding up your shoulders. Wind them up by turning to the opposite direction that the frontside 180 turns, which is towards your back shoulder. After that start turning towards your front shoulder and lift up your front shoulder then your back shoulder as you turn.

Practice doing this with your shoulders for a couple of minutes. It’s a strange motion that you’re doing even on the ground. So when you take it to your board, you should be very comfortable. Once you’ve practice these steps with your shoulders, move on to trying it on your board and do some frontside 180s to really make sure you have those down.

Popping the back foot

As you’re turning, you’re going to be doing a couple of motions all at the same time. You have to bend your knees, pop your tail, bend your front ankle as you would for a regular heelflip. Then, you slide your front foot up the board and flick it off the corner pocket with heel to make the board flip under you. Then all you’ve got to do is make sure your legs follow your upper body. Make sure the board finishes the flip so you can catch it and roll away.

Sounds complicated, right? Well, the good part is it’s the hardest part about the trick. By ensuring you have the timing of it down, you’ll be able to land it in no time.

Potential Barriers

Now let’s go over some problems you’ll come across when learning this trick. Don’t worry, it’s totally normal to be facing barriers for any skateboard trick.

Not Landing

Your board may be landing behind or in front of you. This is happening because your jumping forward when you’re popping and for the board being in front of you, that’s probably because you’re putting your feet down before the flip is completely done.

To fix this, just make sure your legs are being guided by your shoulders. Also make sure you’re lifting your legs up and not jumping forward or trying to step down in the middle of the trick. You can also take a look at your foot position to make sure it’s correct.

Only landing with your front foot

Another problem could be you’re catching it with only the front foot (the foot that flicks/kicks for the heelflip) and your back foot lands on the ground. That’s a very small problem that is mostly coming from not 100 percent committing to the trick. You also could not be comfortable with the turning of your shoulders and shifting your weight. There are two things that I believe will help you out.

The first thing is doing a front pop shuvit motion with your back foot instead of popping straight up when turning. Doing this will make your board and feet move more easily with your upper body. This may also help with the weight shift between the front and back foot when landing/rolling switch.

Not catching before you land

The last big problem I see is not being able to catch the board right before you land or not being able to do the whole trick in the air. Which both can be fixed doing a “pivot” instead of landing the complete 180. This is going to be another step but it’s not too hard to learn.

A pivot is when you land on your front wheels and turn to complete the motion of 180 when you come short of landing one. Think of it as landing at 90-degrees, and completing the rest of the rotation on the ground.

You’re going to want all your weight on the front foot, turn, flick, once you’re in the air you’re going to want to land on the front wheels, keep the back wheels in the air for a millisecond to finish turning all the way for the 180, then your weight should shift to your back foot to land the back wheels, and finally roll away like a boss.


That’s all the step, tips, and problems you need to know to learn a frontside 180 heelflip. I hope this tutorial has helped out anyone learning or trying to fix this trick. Now go out their progress and master this trick. Also, go fast and commit! Trust me it’ll help out with this any trick in skateboarding.

Show us your best frontside heelflips! Braille Skateboarding wants to see you landing these tricks from all over the world. Film a quick clip of you doing your best frontside heelflip and post it on Instagram tagging @brailleskate and #brailleskate.  Let us know which piece of advice helped you the most so we can highlight that and we can get more people landing this awesome trick!

Check out John Hill’s tutorial from our channel. John is a professional skater and an overall awesome guy. Be sure to follow him on Instagram, @johnhill, and subscribe to him on YouTube!

Frontside 180 Heelflip Tutorial